Archive for the ‘ICC’ Tag

ICL and Pakistan

Finally some good news in Pakistan cricket – Sindh High Court has ordered Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) to lift the ban from the 11 players that had signed contracts with the rebel Indian Cricket League (ICL) and PCB owing to public pressure has finally allowed them to feature in the next round of Quaid-e-Azam trophy matches.

According to an ICC spokesperson:

Banning a player from playing in domestic cricket because he participated in the ICL is not a matter for the ICC. Instead, only a member board can take such action. The ICC executive board therefore resolved in 2008 that member boards should take such action against ICL players as they considered appropriate, in light of and in accordance with the requirements of their own local laws. 

The question now is that can such a regulation be applied on international matches? If according to the local laws a player can feature in domestic matches then why can’t the same be applied to international tournaments and encounters. What if the court orders PCB to lift the ban from the international matches – in such a scenario isn’t PCB bound to obey the laws. If political and security reasons can be used as a tool to decide WHERE, WHEN and HOW cricket is played then a similar case should be valid for legal situations and matters. Given the loss Pakistan cricket team has suffered because of the ban on the ICL contracted players and the lack of support and authority by the ICC and its member boards especially BCCI, PCB should go ahead and lift the ban but obviously following the approciate procedure i.e a legal case and the appropriate decision by the High court or even the Supreme court. And guess what could be their comeback tournament – ICC World Twenty20 2009 – a real smack in the face.

May be some hope for the 11 players – Mohammad Sami, Abdul Razzaq, Hasan Raza, Shabbir Ahmed, Mohammad Yousuf, Rana Naved-ul-Hasan, Tahir Mughal, Shahid Yousuf, Khalid Mahmood, Naved Latif and Shahid Nazir.

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Cricket Roundup

The second test match between England and India ended up in a draw but it was not the kind of finish expected from a team that is challenging the might of Australians. If you really want to be No. 1 then you have to play like them – trying to force a result (and not a draw) out of every match especially if you have an upper hand. But on the last day of the second test match, the Indian cricket team were not at all interested in producing a result out of it since they had already secured the series with a win in the first test match. Instead they opted for their batsmen – Yuvraj and Gambhir – to complete their centuries[1]. Couldn’t the same logic had been applied for their bowlers who possibly could have won the match for them especially considering the fact that Zaheer Khan was judged as the Player of the series.

Double standards in cricket were once again on display when ICC announced that it will conduct an independent security assessment of the country before appointing officials for Sri Lanka’s tour[2]. Why such assessment was not carried out in the recently concluded India-England test series when the terrorists attacks were not even 15 days old.Is it double standards or what???

Cricket returns to India

So its finally there – no no I am not talking about cricket or the England team in India but the double standards that have finally made its way into the cricket fraternity. Even after witnessing the recent terrorists attacks in Mumbai and knowing the fact that these especially targetted foreign nationals, the England cricket team is back in India within 15 days as if nothing had happened. What if it had been Pakistan instead of India – England team and in fact all the others would have drained cricket out from the Pakistani soil for God knows how many years. This was witnessed a few months backs when almost half the cricketing world refused to take part in Champions Trophy 2008.

But why??? India is quite different from Pakistan when it comes to cricket:

  • India has huge commercial and social attractions for the foreign teams and their players.
  • The matches involving India have the highest attendance of live audience meaning heavy sponsorship and lucrative TV rights.
  • Last and most important, there is BCCI which is now de facto ICC. While ICC failed to stop Champions Trophy boycott, BCCI managed to bring back cricket on their soil within 15 days.

Having said all this, I am in no way criticizing the England team for touring India. I am writing just to highlight the double standards. I sincerely wish that the series goes ahead as planned and all the matches prove to be a treat for the audience. This series has at least highlighed a strong message that cricket can continue in the toughest of conditions. The same spirit now needs to be adopted for the resumption of cricket in Pakistan and India could be the first one in this regard by not opting out of the Pak-India series in January 2009.